Barbara Turnbull Foundation 
 Contact Us Today
Barbara Turnbull ForumHome Page

 follow .. Barbara Turnbull on Facebook

 * * * * * * * * * *
 




Proud To Be Canadian



The Barbara Turnbull Foundation ..
The Barbara Turnbull Award:  Award Recipients

The Barbara Turnbull Award, established in 2001, recognizes the outstanding work completed by the following researchers who have contributed towards the advancement of spinal cord research. Their valuable work was conducted in Canada. Congratulations to all ..

The $50,000 Prize Winners:

 · 2015 · Dr. Samuel David studies about the mechanisms that control the delivery and release of iron in the nervous system.
 · 2014 · Dr. De Koninck studies the nerve cells of the sensory portion of the spinal cord in both humans and animals.
 · 2013 · Dr. Bretzner at the Centre Hospitalier de l′Université Laval, Quebec won in 2013 for work examining the neural control of movement with a focus on the motor cortex, the brainstem, and the spinal cord.
 · 2012 · Dr. Stephen Scott, at Queen's University, received this honour in recognition of his outstanding research focused on helping Canadians who suffer the effects of spinal cord trauma and stroke.
 · 2011 · Dr. Simon Gosgnach, at the University of Alberta, studies neural networks that are located entirely within the spinal cord and are responsible for generating much of the timing and pattern of muscle activity during walking.
 · 2010 · Drs. James P, Fawcett and Robert M, Brownstone, both tied as 2010 winners for their remarkable work, both from Dalhousie University
 · 2009 · Dr. David Bennett, a repeat winner at the University of Alberta, studies neuronal plasticity following chronic spinal cord injury
 · 2008 · Ken Rose PhD, at Queen's University in Kingston Ontario, uses neurotronic devices to stimulate body movement giving patients partial control
 · 2007 · Dr. Richard Stein, at the University of Alberta, uses neurotronic devices to stimulate body movement giving patients partial control
 · 2006 · Dr. Pierre Drapeau, at the University of Montreal, uses the zebrafish as a model for studies of embryonic development
 · 2005 · Dr. Joseph Culotti, senior investigator at the Center for Neurodevelopment and Cognitive Function, Mount Sinai Hospital
 · 2004 · Dr. David Bennett, a brilliant research scientist involved in a project to understand and treat spasticity
 · 2003 · Dr. Mohamad Sawan, world renowned for his work in the fields of the electric genius and data processing
 · 2002 · Dr. David Kaplan, one of Canada's leading neuroscientists who is based at Toronto's Hospital for Sick Children


Dr. Samuel David:   2015 Recipient

Professor, Neurology and Neurosurgery
Department and Faculty of Medicine
Centre for Research in Neuroscience
Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre,
Montreal, Quebec

Dr. David and his research team are studying the mechanisms that control the delivery and release of iron in the nervous system.

Iron is required for the survival and functioning of nerve cells. However, too much iron can cause damage to nerve cells. Their work has an impact on our understanding of damage following spinal cord and brain injury and diseases such as multiple sclerosis, and ways to promote recovery after nervous system damage.

Dr. David praised Turnbull, who died in May of this year of heart failure at the age of 50. He said .. “I am delighted to be the recipient of this year‘s Barbara Turnbull Award for Spinal Cord Research”.  “Barbara Turnbull was, and continues to be, an inspiration to those living with spinal cord injury, as well as researchers who are striving to make medical advances in this field.”

* More detailed information is available ..  [ here ]

– [ Back to Top ] –


Dr. Yves De Koninck:   2014 Recipient

Professor, PhD
Department of Psychiatry & Neuroscience
Centre Hospitalier de l′Université Laval, Laval, Quebec
-- Also --
Scientific Director
Quebec Mental Health Institute Research Center (CRIUSMQ)
Quebec City, Quebec

Dr. De Koninck studies the nerve cells of the sensory portion of the spinal cord in humans and animals. The nerve cells are responsible for the relay of pain related information from the body to the brain, leading to a perceived sensation.

Injury to the nervous system can induce persistent changes in spinal cord function that cause pain and tenderness to develop and be maintained for very long periods (days to years) after healing. The present project aims at determining how inhibitory control of nerve cell function is regulated and how it is altered in the spinal cord under pathological conditions such as peripheral neuropathy.

Understanding the long term alterations which take place in the spinal cord after injury is of critical importance to design treatments for the prevention and alleviation of chronic neuropathic pain syndromes such as postherpetic neuralgia, causalgia following damage to a major nerve, diabetic neuropathy, allodynia, hyperalgesia, and spontaneous or phantom limb pain.

* More detailed information is available ..  [ here ]

– [ Back to Top ] –


Dr. Frédéric Bretzner:   2013 Recipient

Assistant Professor
Department of Psychiatry and Neurosciences
Centre Hospitalier de l′Université Laval, Laval, Quebec

Dr. Bretzner′s work studies the relationship between electric phenomena and bodily processes that are important for initiation and modulation of locomotion between the brain and the spinal cord. The primary goal of this research is to get a better understanding of the neural control of movement with a focus on the motor cortex, the brainstem, and the spinal cord.

This important work focuses on using a combination of genetic, molecular, anatomical, optogenetic and electrophysiological techniques to study the motor control. The analysis ranges from the ionic channels, neurons, neural networks to the motor behavior.

Studies have focused on the normal physiology with the long-term aim of restoring motor function, and especially locomotion, following central nervous system injury or diseases that affect gait.

* More detailed information is available ..  [ here ]

– [ Back to Top ] –


Dr. Stephen Scott:   2012 Recipient

Professor, PhD
Department of Biomedical and Molecular Sciences
Queen's University, Kingston, Ontario

Dr. Scott and his research team focus on how feedback to the primary motor cortex, which is a key region in the brain for voluntary control, interacts with spinal activity.

This research enables them to understand how sensory feedback from the limb (and vision) is essential while performing voluntary motor skills, such as reaching and grasping a cup or other objects in the world. The knowledge gained will also bring insights into the impact of neurological disorders, such as stroke, on brain function and motor performance.

Dr. Scott‘s research has also produced KINARM, a robotic system that measures with amazing sensitivity and precision, the effects of an injury to the brain affecting a person‘s ability to perform ordinary movements and tasks.

* More detailed information is available ..  [ here ]

– [ Back to Top ] –


Dr. Simon Gosgnach:   2011 Recipient

Assistant Professor, Research
Department of Physiology
University of Alberta

Financial support from the CIHR, Brain Canada and Barbara Turnbull Foundation will support the investigation of one of these populations, the "dI6" interneurons identified as central pattern generators (CSGs). Preliminary work in his laboratory has shown that these cells are active during walking and have intrinsic properties of cells that are responsible for initiating locomotor activity in the spinal cord.

Over the next several years he plans to identify their specific function during walking as well as the manner in which they are interconnected with other components on the locomotor CPG. These studies will mark an essential step in understanding how the basic locomotor rhythm is generated, and may help to drive the development of therapies aimed at enhancing the functional recovery of movement after spinal cord injury.

* More detailed information is available ..  [ here ]

– [ Back to Top ] –


Dr. James P, Fawcett  and  Dr. Robert M, Brownstone:   2010 Recipients

Dr. James P, Fawcett
Assistant Professor
Pharmacology and Surgery
Dalhousie Medical School
Dalhousie University

 

Dr. Robert M, Brownstone
Neurosurgeon, and Professor
Surgery, Anatomy & Neurobiology
Dalhousie Medical School
Dalhousie University

Dr. Brownstone, a neurosurgeon and professor in Dalhousie Medical School's departments of Surgery and Anatomy & Neurobiology, and Dr. Fawcett, an assistant professor in the departments of Pharmacology and Surgery, are investigating the spinal cord's control of muscular movements and the rhythmic pattern of walking. They are founding members of the Atlantic Mobility Action Project (www.amap.ca), a new Atlantic-based initiative to find solutions to mobility problems caused by spinal cord injury and neurological disease.

Picture of Dr. James P, Fawcett receiving the 2010 Award
click thumbnail

Picture of Dr. Robert M. Brownstone, Dr. Michael G. Fehlings - host of the Charles Tator-Barbara Turnbull Lectureship Series in Spinal Cord Injury, Barbara Turnbull, and Dr. James P, Fawcett
click thumbnail

Picture of Dr. Robert M, Brownstone receiving the 2010 Award
click thumbnail

"We cannot overstate the importance of basic research in the quest for a cure; there is still so much that needs to be learned about how the spinal cord works .." says Barbara Turnbull.

Canadian researchers like Rob Brownstone and Jim Fawcett are having an influence on spinal cord research around the world.

* More detailed information is available ..  [ here ]

– [ Back to Top ] –


Dr. David Bennett:  2009 Recipient

Researcher, Studentship Committee
Division of Neuroscience
Faculty of Rehabilitative Medicine
University of Alberta

Dr. Bennett is a medical scientist involved in the project; Neuronal Plasticity Following Chronic Spinal Cord Injury: Animal studies. This work is being conducted at the
University of Alberta in Canada, and is part of a larger research project involving microstimulation of the spinal
cord to restore movement in spinal-cord-injured people.


Picture of Dr. Bennett receiving Award
click thumbnail

Dr. David Bennett studies spasticity, a condition that can severely impede motor function and is often poorly treated, after spinal cord injury. The goals of this research are to increase scientific understanding about these disorders and to find ways to prevent, treat, and cure them.

* More detailed information is available ..  [ here ]

– [ Back to Top ] –


Dr. Kenneth Rose, PhD:  2008 Recipient

Professor of Physiology and Centre for Neuroscience
Co-Director of the CIHR Group in Sensory-Motor Integration
Associate Dean, Life Sciences and Biochemistry
Faculty of Health Sciences
Botterell Hall, Stuart Street
Queen‘s University, Kingston, ON

Dr. Kenneth Rose‘s research involved a specific hypotheses about the contribution of dendritic structure to the input/output properties of neck motoneurons.

Dr. Rose deduced that the integrative capacity of motor neurons is not limited to simple linear summation of synaptic inputs. Instead, due to local changes in driving potential and activation or inactivation of voltage-dependent channels, motor neurons can adjust their input/output properties depending on the spatial distribution of the active synapses.

* More detailed information is available ..  [ here ]

– [ Back to Top ] –


Dr. Richard Stein:  2007 Recipient

Research Professor
Professor Emeritus of Physiology and Neuroscience
University of Alberta

Dr. Stein‘s research involves human and animal experiments, both of which are supported by CIHR and the Christopher and Dana Reeve Foundation. The human work involves projects to improve performance in persons with spinal cord injury (SCI), stroke, multiple sclerosis and other central nervous conditions through the development of innovative devices.

For example, the WalkAide (walkaide.com) is a patented body-worn stimulator that senses the tilt of the lower leg and turns stimulation on and off during walking, as required to lift the foot during the swing phase of the gait cycle for people who have a condition known as foot drop. This device is now available in the U.S., Canada and other countries through Innovative Neurotronics Inc. and has won awards (Frost & Sullivan Award, 2006; DaVinci Award, 2007).

* More detailed information is available ..  [ here ]

– [ Back to Top ] –


Dr. Pierre Drapeau:  2006 Recipient

Professor and Chair
Department of Pathology and Cell Biology
Université de Montréal

Dr. Drapeau uses the zebrafish as a model for studies of embryonic development. This small vertebrate embryo develops rapidly, is transparent and has a sequenced genome, which together simplify the study of nervous system development.

Dr. Drapeau is widely recognised for his contributions to the study of synapse formation (connectivity) between nerve cells during the functional development of the spinal cord. His work has led to the discovery of a novel mechanism of synaptic transmission at fast neuromuscular junctions and the role for synaptic activity in determining neural identity during development.

* More detailed information is available ..  [ here ]

– [ Back to Top ] –


Dr. Joseph Culotti:  2005 Recipient

Senior Investigator
Center for Neurodevelopment and Cognitive Function
Samuel Lunenfeld Research Institute
Mount Sinai Hospital
Toronto, Ontario

Dr. Joseph Culotti, a Senior Investigator at the Samuel Lunenfeld Research Institute at Mount Sinai Hospital, part of the University of Toronto‘s Health Research Network, is using research to try and eliminate the physical and emotional costs of spinal cord injury. He's hoping that, by better understanding spinal cord development, new methods for spinal cord repair will be possible.

Instead of using mice and rats for experiments, Dr. Culotti studies worms in order to fully understand the nature of spinal cord injuries. His research team has been credited with discovering significant similarities between how nematode neurons grow and move, and how this process operates in the developing human spinal cord.

* More detailed information is available ..  [ here ]

– [ Back to Top ] –


Dr. David Bennett:  2004 Recipient

Researcher, Studentship Committee
Division of Neuroscience
Faculty of Rehabilitative Medicine
University of Alberta

Dr. Bennett is a medical scientist involved in the project; Neuronal Plasticity Following Chronic Spinal Cord Injury: Animal studies. This work is being conducted at the University of Alberta in Canada, and is part of a larger research project involving microstimulation of the spinal cord to restore movement in spinal-cord-injured people.

Dr. David Bennett studies spasticity, a condition that can severely impede motor function and is often poorly treated, after spinal cord injury. The goals of this research are to increase scientific understanding about these disorders and to find ways to prevent, treat, and cure them.

* More detailed information is available ..  [ here ]

– [ Back to Top ] –


Dr. Mohamad Sawan:  2003 Recipient

Professor
École Polytechnique de Montréal
Department of Electric Engineering

Mohamad Sawan has received world recognition for researchers working in the fields of the electric genius and data processing (intelligent implantable medical devices). In 2002, he was elected an honorary Fellow of the Canadian Academy of Genius.

Dr. Sawan is studying remote bladder volume measurement and implant monitoring, as well as subsequent selective stimulation to enhance the ability of people with spinal cord injuries to empty their bladder. Intelligent implantable medical devices produce electric signals which replace the stimuli generated by the system to control the bladder.

* More detailed information is available ..  [ here ]

– [ Back to Top ] –


Dr. David Kaplan:  2002 Recipient

Head, Cancer Research Program
Hospital for Sick Children;
Canada Research Chair in Cancer and Neuroscience;
Professor, Department of Molecular and Medical Genetics
University of Toronto

Working with co-investigator and well-known Canadian neuroscientist Dr. Freda Miller, Dr. Kaplan has identified proteins in cells that stimulate their survival, inhibit their death, and promote their growth and regeneration.

The aim of Kaplan's research was to develop treatments to better treat neurodegenerative diseases and nerve injuries.

* More detailed information is available ..  [ here ]

– [ Back to Top ] –

Printer Friendly Version
Top Of Page



Contact Barbara Turnbull
    1 (416) 484-9413
Contact Barbara Turnbull
We Need Your Help

You need Java turned on to see our message.

Make A Donation Here





FEEDBACK

 What Is Your Name

 Email Address

 How Can We Help?



Read My New eBook
What I Know: Lessons from My 30 Years as a Quadriplegic
[ click here ]



 
Barbara Turnbull

Get Online Designs
Spinal Cord Research